September 20 – April 12: Dutch Masters at the Bruce Museum

Large Northern Baroque collection including Dutch Masters will be on view at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich from September 20 until April 12, 2015.

One of the largest and most varied collections of Northern Baroque art assembled anywhere in recent decades will be on view at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich beginning this fall. Northern Baroque Splendor, The Hohenbuchau Collection from: Liechtenstein. The Princely Collections, Vienna will be displayed across multiple galleries at the Bruce beginning on September 20 and continuing through April 12, 2015. The collection includes among others paintings of Gerard Dou, Simon de Vlieger, Frans van Mieris and Jacob van Ruisdael.

The Hohenbuchau Collection was gathered by Otto Christian and Renate Fassbender and has been on long-term loan to the Collections of the Prince of Liechtenstein in Vienna, where it was exhibited in its entirety in the former Liechtenstein Museum in 2011.

Primarily comprised of Dutch and Flemish seventeenth-century paintings, the collection exhibits all the naturalism, visual probity and technical brilliance for which those schools are famous. While many modern collections of Old Masters specialize in a single style or subject matter, the Hohenbuchau Collection is admirable for offering examples of virtually all the genres produced by Lowland artists – history painting, portraiture, genre, landscapes, seascapes, still lifes and flower pieces, animal paintings and hunting scenes.

“The Hohenbuchau Collection is not only remarkable for offering examples of virtually all the genres produced by Dutch Masters, but also for the rich diversity of size, format, and subject within each genre,” says Peter C. Sutton, Executive Director of the Bruce Museum and the organizer of the exhibition. “Particularly unique to the collection are the number of individual paintings executed by more than one artist, working in collaboration. Dutch artists tended to specialize, whether in figures, landscapes or still lifes, but they were not averse to collaboration.”